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Congratulations to our Post-doc Jamie Anderson in gaining the 2nd Position at the 13th Annual Postdoc Research Exhibition for her media submission

Congratulations to our Post-doc Jamie Anderson in gaining the 2nd Position at the 13th Annual Postdoc Research Exhibition for her media submission

Jamie Anderson

Dr. Jamie Lee Anderson from the Africana Research Center won the 2nd Position in the Media Competition at the 13th Annual Postdoc Research Exhibition for her documentary "100 Years of Bate Folha" about one of the oldest Candomblé houses in Salvador da Bahia. Click here to watch the clip!

Congratulations to Christopher Tounsel on the publication of his article, "Two Sudans, Human Rights, and the Afterlives of St. Josephine Bakhita", published in Christianity and Human Rights Reconsidered

Congratulations to Christopher Tounsel on the publication of his article, "Two Sudans, Human Rights, and the Afterlives of St. Josephine Bakhita", published in Christianity and Human Rights Reconsidered

Christianity and Human Rights Reconsidered

Congratulations to Chris Tounsel on the publication of his article, "Two Sudans, Human Rights, and the Afterlives of St. Josephine Bakhita", published in Christianity and Human Rights Reconsidered, ed. Daniel Jenkins-Steinmetz and Sarah Shortall (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020), pp. 261-275.

Congratulations to Professor Fabienne Kanor on the publication of her new novel, Humus

While researching in Nantes, a port city enriched by the slave trade, celebrated French novelist Fabienne Kanor encountered a chilling report written in 1774 by the commander of a slave ship, Le Soleil. Captain Louis Mosnier explained the loss of valuable “cargo” when fourteen African women escaped from the ship’s hold and leaped overboard into the sea, rather than be taken into slavery. Half of them drowned or were eaten by sharks.
From this historical episode, Kanor has composed a powerful novel that shifts our focus from commerce to the women themselves. In this polyphonic work, each woman tells her own story. Their disparate lives from differing cultures, conditions, and perspectives intersect and intertwine through their violent transition from freedom to captivity, and form a chorus in their collective act of resistance.

Dr. Sinfree Makoni is awarded as a co-collaborator for a SSRC Rapid Response Grant

Congratulations to Dr. Sinfree Makoni, who was awarded as a co-collaborator for a Social Science Research Council Rapid Response Grant. 

https://covid19research.ssrc.org/grantee/humor-as-a-semiotic-resource-coping-with-covid-19-stress-in-africa/

 

Congratulations to Dr. Sinfree Makoni on the publication of these two books recognizing his work: African Applied Linguistics and Language in Africa

Congratulations to Dr. Sinfree Makoni on the publication of these two books recognizing his work: African Applied Linguistics and Language in Africa.

You can find both books on Amazon:

African Applied Linguistics

African Applied Linguistics challenges orthodox applied linguistics. African Applied Linguistics is influenced by Southern Epistemologies and decolonial scholarship. In this book, Sinfree Makoni, one of the leading figures of Southern Epistemologies and decolonial linguistic scholarship questions the foundations of linguistics as an academic field. He construes applied linguistics as a decontextualized and institutionalized extension of the metalinguistic practices of the west. As such, Applied Linguistics is ill- suited to address contemporary sociolinguistic challenges of the Global South. African Applied Linguistics calls for a change in the direction in which both 'languages' and 'language' as universal phenomena are theorized.

Language in Africa

Language in Africa marks the birth of decolonial Integrational Linguistics. It is a critique of linguistic theorizing about language, literacy, and language education.  In this volume, Sinfree Makoni explores the relevance of Integrationism as a prism through which one can examine the construction of language within colonial linguistics. In the book he argues that terms such as indigenous languages misrepresent the time-and locale-specific nature of linguistic communication.  The centrality of the role of lay person-oriented linguistics in decolonial Integrational linguistics serves as an alternative to orthodox linguistics and can be aligned with colonial and postcolonial linguistics, which seeks to replace colonialism and African elites with more lay- oriented participation in civil society.